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#423

LUNCH WITH MARILISA ALLEGRINI

08 Nov 2016 By

Marilisa Allegrini promotes Allegrini wines and the Valpolicella area, as well she should. She’s a scion of the family that has been around since the 16th century. Also the perfect person to speak to about Amarones.

We had lunch with Marilisa Allegrini, yes, the scion of the Allegrini estate, known for their awarded wines, and most notably for their unsurpassed Amarone.

Their Amarone is produced in the renown Valpolicella region, an area whose growth, history and fortunes is inextricably linked to her family. And it’s a story that goes back to the 16th century, where the Allegrini family was already prominent in the local community, and also important land owners. All this started with their founding father Allegrino Allegrini.

— The family home Villa Della Torre comes into existence; it’s a splendid example of Italian Renaissance architecture, and it’s nestled in the Palazzo della Torre vineyard, whose grapes produce a range of intense and complex wines.

marilisa allegrini

The family also produces a superb extra dry processo with 100% glera grapes.

— The Valpolicella region (valley of many cellars) is know for its great red wines. And since Roman times, the wine Recioto (then know as Retico), produced via the truly original ‘appassimento’ (grape-drying) technique, was well-loved. Today you know it as Amarone, the most beloved of Italian wines.

— Poets have drank of Amarone’s magic, and many have penned loving tributes: “How to praise the virtues of this wne that has the colour of sunrises and sunsets, that is wise and eloquent…lyrical…sharp-witted,” Berto Barbarani, Veronese poet.

Marilisa Allegrini

— The one to watch: Amarone Classico 2011. The 50mm rainfall was a godsend, and harvesting began in September. Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella and Oseleta were left to air dry until December. This resulted in a wine with imposing structure and depth. It is a keeper, with a potential to age for more than 20 years.

— Marilisa Allegrini and her brother Franco now run and control the family’s legacy. There is already a seventh generation scion groomed to take over. Now you never have to worry about your supply. 

Like this? There’s a free 24-hour wine fountain in Italy

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